'Gone Girl' Poster Doesn't Look Like a Poster


This is a pretty ballsy move on the part of David Fincher's marketing of the upcoming Gone Girl. No title, no listed actors (not even the future Batman), only a release date along with the ticker-tape mention of a local disappearance. It's very striking artwork, but it's not hard to see why the director of Fight Club and The Social Network is still considered a rebel after working in the business for 20+ years.

The film stars Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike, Tyler Perry, Neil Patrick Harris, Missi Pyle, Patrick Fugit, Casey Wilson and Emily Ratajkowski.

Gone Girl hits theaters on October 3rd.
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At Movie Mezzanine: A Defense of Nicolas Cage


When Nicolas Cage appears in a trailer, audiences cringe before he opens his mouth to utter even a single word. They don’t remember the solid actor from Moonstruck, Raising Arizona and Leaving Las Vegas, or even the blockbuster mode Cage from the National Treasure series or Con-Air, all they see is the man screaming “Not the bees!”

Yes, Nicolas Cage appears in bad films, but is there an actor/actress who hasn’t? For all of the award nominations and critical acclaim that Meryl Streep has, she was also in She-Devil starring Roseanne Barr. No one is above a bad movie. What Cage does that other actors don’t is he firmly plants himself into the material, going haywire for maximum entertainment value. He certainly could have been more muted in The Wicker Man remake, but would that have made the film any better? Hardly. Yet, by going fully insane for the conclusion of that film, Cage elevates the material from forgettable thriller into camp masterpiece.

Read more at Movie Mezzanine!
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Review: Captain America - The Winter Soldier


Captain America has always been described as a man out of time, but nowhere is that made clearer than in a post-9/11 U.S. The world after that attack is one that is constantly under surveillance. Agencies like S.H.I.E.L.D. rely on pre-emptive measures to counter whatever enemies may throw at them. Since the events of The Avengers, acquiring funding for this 24/7 surveillance is not an issue.

Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) is making peace with that world a little at a time. He’s catching up with the modern day pop culture (yes, he’s seen War Games, no he hasn’t listened to Nirvana), but adjusting to the new landscape is much more difficult. His mission has always been to do what’s right, but it is becoming harder to tell what is right anymore.

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Review: Bad Words

  

Guy Trilby (Jason Bateman) admits he doesn’t always think things through before acting on them. That is a little obvious to the audience as he preps himself to take the stage opposite dozens of children to compete in a spelling bee. The reaction to a 40 year-old man taking place in a children’s competition is naturally a harsh one and, after Guy wins the trophy, he must run to escape with his head.

This is the third such bee that Guy has won on his course to the Golden Quills Spelling Bee finals in Los Angeles. The beat reporter (Kathryn Hahn) following Guy around on his trail of hurt feelings has a great number of questions about why Guy is doing all of this, but he isn’t saying. One thing is for sure, the man is a veritable terminator when it comes to picking out someone’s biggest insecurity and then pouncing on it.

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Review: Noah




Black Swan bought a lot of critical and commercial goodwill for Aronofsky in 2010, yet no one would have anticipated he would invest that goodwill into a Biblical epic, especially one nearing three hours long. Whether the new elements added to Noah will enthrall or enrage audiences is yet to be seen, but win, lose or draw, a project of this epic of scale is worthy of your attention.

Noah (Russell Crowe) is a heavily taxed man. Plagued with nightmares of damnation and death, he is reached out to by the Lord to undertake the building of an ark before the apocalypse lays waste to all the eye can see, a cleansing fire before a great flood to wipe evil from Earth. Noah's task is to build an ark, load it up with all of the animals and start anew. As Elwood Blues would put it "he's on a mission from God."
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Lars Von Trier Retrospective on Movie Mezzanine


During a town meeting Tom decides to put a theory to the test: if human beings are basically good they will allow someone to stay in their midst without distrust. The test comes in the form of a stranger seeking asylum in their town after a swarm of black automobiles ask about her. The local residents are hesitant to grant her request, but Tom's plan to have her do chores for the town to justify her staying sways them. Their civility doesn't last long after a wanted poster is put up and authorities come around asking for Grace. Now with the town reassessing the cost of harboring Grace, she may find that Dogville's teeth are going to be bared.

By filming Dogville on a sound stage, Lars Von Trier really enhances the claustrophobia and fear that plagues Grace during her stay in Dogville. Von Trier has made more inflammatory works in Antichrist, but Dogville's horrors are much more nuanced. The fear here comes from the decent, earnest, small-town folk who are only doing the best they can for a stranger. Now that is horrifying.

Read about the rest of Von Trier's career at Movie Mezzanine
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